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Jerry Brooks Lackey

March 12, 1939 ~ November 25, 2018 (age 79)

Mr. Jerry Brooks Lackey, 79, resident of High Point, died November 25, 2018 at his home.

Jerry was born March 12, 1939 in Charlotte, North Carolina, a son to the late Rome and Carrie Moose Lackey.  A resident of this area since 1979, he was retired from AT&T and was a member of Life Community Church. While serving in the U.S. Navy, he met JoAnn Elliott and they later married on April 26, 1963.  In addition to his wife of 56 years, JoAnn Lackey, he is survived by his daughter, Carrie Smith and husband Dean of Jamestown; sons, Michael Lackey of High Point and Kevin Lackey and wife Tara of High Point; sisters, Loreece Shaw of Archdale and Judy Bess of Statesville; brother, David Lackey of Statesville; grandchildren, Christian, Connor, Caroline, Grayson, Noah, Carter and Julia; and sister-in-law, Frances Hall of Suwanee, GA.  He was preceded in death by his brother, Donald Lackey. Jerry was deeply loved by his wife, children, family, many friends and people in the community.  On a daily basis, he touched and impacted countless lives by his random acts of kindness and his smile. Jerry fought the good fight.  He finished the race.  He kept the faith.  He is loved and will be sorely missed but we rejoice that he is healed now and with his Lord and Savior Jesus Christ and reunited with family and friends that have gone before him.

Visitation will be at 1:00 p.m. this Saturday, December 1st at Cumby Family Funeral Service in High Point.  Funeral services will follow at 2:00 p.m. Saturday in the chapel of the funeral home with Pastor Jake Thornhill officiating.  Interment with military honors will follow at Deep River Friends Meeting Cemetery.  Memorials may be directed to Helping Hands, 2301 S. Main St. High Point, NC, 27263.

 


Donations may be made to:

Helping Hands
2301 S. Main St., High Point NC 27263


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